Sustainable Laboratory Certified Labs

Do you want to get your laboratory on the list?

Please contact Ken Keeler at 936-6663 (kkeeler@umich.edu)

Displaying 71 - 80 of 209

Gold

Burmeister Laboratory BSRB Room 5488

4/06/2017

Our lab validates exome sequencing data by PCR and Sanger Sequencing with the goal of identifying novel ataxia genes.  We collect whole blood from subjects and genotype for behavioral related variants.  We also receive primary tissue samples such as whole blood and saliva and extract DNA from these tissues.  We biopsy skin from patients, use episomal plasmids to reprogram cultured patient specific fibroblasts into iPSCs, and differentiate these into neurons.  Waste generated in the lab is disposed of adhering to EHS guidelines.

Being a responsible laboratory is important as waste streams generated can often be harmful to the environment if not handled and disposed of properly. We continually strive to seek out and implement more environmentally friendly alternatives.  It’s exciting that the Burmeister lab is now one of the many sustainable labs at the University of Michigan following the University's sustainability guidelines.  We are very proud to say we are ambassadors of U of M, Planet Blue. Linda Gates, Manager

Cornell Laboratory BSRB Rooms 4468

4/06/2017

Our work focuses on immunology and cell signaling research using the following techniques: genotyping, western blotting, immunoprecipitation, cell culture – including work with endotoxins, flow cytometry, mouse surgery, blood draws (humans and mice), work with adeno – and retroviruses, cell transfection, RNA/DNA/Protein extraction.  We employ flow cytometer, PCR, qPCR, gel documentation system, centrifuges, QIAcube etc. in our work.  Hazardous and non-hazardous waste generated in our lab is disposed of adhering to U-M EHS guidelines.

“Reduce, reuse, and recycle” should be goals for everyone in daily life. Joining the Sustainable Lab Program has given us a platform to promote and implement these practices in Cornell Laboratory.  We have learned more strategies of becoming an environmentally friendly research lab and strongly recommend to others. Kelli McDonough, Manager 

Amidon Laboratory Pharmacy Rooms 4009 & 4025

4/06/2017

In our work bioinformatic tools have been used for the identification of new targets for anti-cancer prodrug delivery. This will mark a new era in the drug absorption, transport and delivery, a beginning for molecular biopharmaceutics. The information available in our lab expression databases in addition to public information is skimmed using various software tools to shortlist possible targets and various studies done to understand the feasibility of those targets for prodrug delivery.  The microarray and Genechip data provide powerful information for designing prodrug targeting strategies.  We use HPLC for separation and purification of target compounds.   Waste generated in our lab is disposed of using OSEH guidelines.

“Participating in the Sustainable Lab program has proven to be highly beneficial to our lab. We initiated a few recycling programs and took action to conserve energy.  PIAB systems are helping us save on water consumption. The Chemical Reuse program has us allowed us to procure chemicals, etc. at no cost. This is a great program.  Thank you OCS.S”

 -- Hiro Tsume, Lab Manager

Smith Laboratory LSI Room 3378

4/04/2017

Our research focuses on understanding the complexity of protein structure and function using X-ray crystallography as a three dimensional tool.  Part of our research is in examining the structures of infectious pathogens including the RNA viruses that cause West Nile disease, yellow fever, and dengue hemorrhagic fever.  We employ molecular biology, crystallographic and spectroscopic techniques in our work. Waste generated in the lab is disposed of adhering to EHS guidelines.

Being an environmentally responsible citizen of this Earth should start at home and continue seamlessly into the laboratory. It’s exciting that the Smith lab is now one of the many sustainable labs at the University of Michigan following the University's sustainability guidelines.  We are very proud to say we are ambassadors of U of M, Planet Blue. Jamie Konwerski, Manager

Boyle Laboratory MSRBI Room 4526

4/04/2017

Research in the Boyle lab focuses on understanding the complex “regulatory code” within the human genome and its impact on gene regulation.  We utilize human cell culture as well as molecular biology techniques including, but not limited to, cloning, ChIP, qPCR, and high throughput sequencing in the wet lab to explore the relationship between cis-regulatory elements and transcription factors. 

“With the help of the Sustainable Lab program staff, our wet lab space has taken many steps to create a safer and more sustainable laboratory environment.  We have eliminated ethidium bromide and use the SYBR Safe gel dye alternative, recycle waste when appropriate, purchase eco-friendly products, and turn off and unplug unused devices to reduce our energy consumption.  By utilizing the Chemical Reuse program, we try to first implement used materials before purchasing new ones.  It is a pleasure to participate in this program to help U-M reach its campus-wide sustainability goals”

 -- Dr. Jessica Switzenberg, Lab Manager

Irani & Segal Laboratory BSRB Room 4218

4/04/2017

Our lab studies interactions between the immune and central nervous system in the context of autoimmune demyelinating disease.  We try to understand the mechanism of multiple sclerosis using the mouse model experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.  Cellular and molecular biology techniques are employed in our research.  Hazardous and non-hazardous waste generated in our lab is disposed of adhering to U-M EHS guidelines.

“Reduce, reuse, and recycle” should be goals for everyone in daily life. Joining the Sustainable Lab Program has given me a platform to promote and implement these practices in my lab. We have learned more strategies of becoming an environmentally friendly research lab and recommend to others. Amanda Huber

Conrad Jobst Vascular Research Laboratory NCRC 26 Room 263N

3/02/2017

Our Laboratory studies and evaluates novel therapeutics for the prevention and treatment of deep venous thrombosis.  We use in vivo and molecular methods to study therapeutic drug response to lessen venous disease pathogenesis  Our group engages interdisciplinary collaborations within and outside of the U-M, for the extrapolation of pre-clinical research findings to develop new preventative and therapeutic strategies for patients. We employ molecular biology techniques along with tissue cultures.  Waste streams generated are manifested and disposed of in accordance with U-M EHS guidelines. 

"Through the participation in this program we are reducing our energy consumption by closing fume hood sashes, powering down the equipment that is not in use. We also increased our recycling efforts in the lab to reduce waste. We are glad to get recognized as a U-M Sustainable Laboratory through this program.  We thank OCS for giving us this opportunity." Karen Schultz, Lab Manager

Grembecka & Cierpicki Laboratory MSRBI 4507, 4514, 4516, & 4522

2/23/2017

Our research interests focus on structural biology of cancer associated proteins and in the development of small molecule inhibitors targeting cancer related proteins. Our work involves in developing therapeutic agents for novel epigenetic targets in cancer.  We employ cellular biology, molecular biology, biochemistry and chemistry techniques in our laboratory.  Waste generated in our lab is disposed in adherence to OSEH guidelines.

Participation in the Sustainable Lab Recognition Program has improved our awareness of the environmental impact of our research. It has helped us to develop energy-saving practices, reduced our hazardous waste generation, and introduced us to various recycling streams. Trupta Purohit, lab manager

Leopold Laboratory NCRC B520 Room 1400

2/22/2017

Our lab focused on the identification and optimization of molecular targeted approaches to disrupt KRAS mediated oncogenic signaling.  We are focused on the design of improved treatment strategies specifically directed towards pancreatic and colorectal cancers.  Our lab utilizes variety of techniques, including in vitro cellular assays, mutational analysis, in vivo pharmacology, western blotting, and PCR.  Waste generated in our lab is disposed of adhering to OSEH guidelines.

“Reduce, reuse, and recycle” should be goals for everyone in daily life. Joining the Sustainable Lab Program has given me a platform to promote and implement these practices in my lab.  We have learned more strategies of becoming an environmentally friendly research lab and recommend to others. Libby Ziemke, Manager

Somers' Laboratory NCRC B520 Rooms G138-139

2/21/2017

Our research is focused on epidemiology, comorbidities, and public health impact on rheumatic and autoimmune diseases.  Our studies involve ovarian preservation in patients exposed to alkylating agents, e.g. cyclophosphamide (CYC) and clinical epidemiology of SLE, including studies of subclinical cardiovascular disease in SLE and gene expression based molecular classification on lupus nephritis.  We employ cell and molecular biology techniques in our work. Waste generated in our lab is disposed of adhering to OSEH guidelines.

Our team is pleased to be involved in the sustainable lab program. We aim to implement eco-friendly practices in our clinical, administrative, and laboratory operations. This program has given us a lot of new information and motivation to improve our procedures and promote sustainability to others in the community.   Sarah Schafran, Manager

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