Sustainable Laboratory Certified Labs

Do you want to get your laboratory on the list?

Please contact Ken Keeler at 936-6663 (kkeeler@umich.edu)

Displaying 51 - 60 of 209

Gold

Koutmou Laboratory Chemistry Room 2050 $ 2054

8/10/2017

The research in our lab focuses on investigating the biological consequences of ribosome encountering faulty mRNA.  Part of our research is to study how post-transcriptional modifications alter mRNA structure, translation, and stability, and how the ribonucleoprotein content of different mRNAs is controlled by their modification status.  We employ molecular biology, biochemical, and genome-wide (ribosome profiling) techniques in our work. Some of the techniques include molecular cloning, protein purification by FPLC, reconstituted in vitro translation, transient kinetics, ribosome profiling, western blotting etc., Hazardous and non-hazardous waste generated in our lab is disposed of adhering to U-M EHS guidelines.

“We are a pleased to be a part of the Sustainable lab recognition program. With the help of the Office of Sustainability, our lab has taken all the needed steps for energy conservation, reducing chemical waste and recycling of materials. We strongly recommend other labs to be a proud member of this group.” Taslima Khan, Lab manager  

ChE 460 Unit II Operations Teaching Laboratory GG Brown 2409 & 3409

8/01/2017

This is the ChE 460 Unit Operations II lab. The focus of the laboratory is the production and purification of biodiesel from soybean or algal oil as well as the exploration of recycle and reuse of excess reactants.  Students use large quantities of solvents.  Students use analytical techniques such as gas chromatography and UV-Vis spectroscopy to analyze their samples.  They use other lab equipment for sample preparation.  Hazardous and solid waste generated from this lab is disposed of following U-M EHS guidelines. 

“In our ChE 460, Unit Operations II course, students are focusing on pilot-plant scale experimentation.  For a sustainable lab, we are trying to focus on waste minimization with reuse of glassware and use of “greener” solvents.  In the general overview of biodiesel production, students examine distillation as a way to recycle excess methanol in the pilot plant system.  Since students are using hazardous chemicals and solvents, safety and proper waste disposal is always a major focus.”  Dr. Chris Barr, Undergraduate Laboratory Supervisor, Chemical Engineering

ChE 489 Product Design Teaching Lab HH Dow Room 3135

8/01/2017

This is the ChE 489 general use lab for seniors opting for product design.  Student enrollment is approximately 30/year.  Student projects have varied from water treatment systems to consumer goods to pharmaceuticals.  Waste generated from this lab varies significantly year-to-year and are disposed of adhering to U-M EHS guidelines. 

“The ChE 489 course is the second half of our year-long Product Design course.  Becoming a certified sustainable teaching laboratory will help our students understand not only green chemistry and engineering principles in their product development process but also might inspire them to choose sustainable purchasing practices during their experimentation” Dr. Chris Barr, Undergraduate Laboratory Supervisor, Chemical Engineering

Raghavan Laboratory MSII Room 6711

7/27/2017

Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I molecules bind to intracellular peptides and present these peptides to cytotoxic T cells, which recognize and kill virus-infected cells and tumor cells. HLA class I molecules also regulate the functional activities of natural killer (NK) cells of the immune response. Our laboratory studies the assembly pathways of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules. The HLA class I genes are among the most polymorphic of human genes, and these genes were determinants of life and death prior to the availability of modern medical interventions. We study how genetic variations in HLA class I affect the biology of HLA class I assembly in the cell, and the resulting influences upon disease outcomes. We also study mechanisms of protein folding in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of cells, and their dysregulation in disease. A better understanding of these fundamental cellular and molecular processes will allow more targeted approaches to treatments of infectious diseases, cancers and protein misfolding diseases.  

"Strong environmental, health and safety management (EHS) is critical to all laboratory research, including our own. Now, more than ever, it is important to do what we can to conserve energy and protect the environment. Many small changes in laboratory practices can have a large impact on the environment. For example, the use of Gel Red instead of Ethidium Bromide improves environmental safety. By joining the Sustainable Lab program, our laboratory has increased awareness about the most environmentally healthy and safe lab practices, which will help towards the preservation and sustenance of our planet for future generations." - Stephanie Mrowczynski

 

Richardson/Somers Laboratory BSRB Room 3220

7/25/2017

The research in our lab focuses on the immunology and epigenetics of autoimmune disease with special attention on lupus.  Techniques are biologic based and include working with human and animal tissues, in vitro culture, PCR, Western blots, and ELISA’s.  Equipment and techniques performed are in accordance with these assays.  Waste generated from our is disposed of following EHS guidelines.

“We were not aware of the large implications on recycling and energy conservation that small changes in a lab can have big impact on the environment, such as choosing environmentally-friendly alternatives to dyes and recycling, until joining the Sustainable Lab program. Now more than ever it is important to do what we can to conserve energy and protect the environment, and this program allows our lab to do both on a daily basis”. Dr. Faith Strickland, Lab Manager

Cohen Laboratory NCRC Bldg. 20 Room 326-05W

7/20/2017

Our research focuses on the translational targeted cancer-drug development and drug delivery systems in Thyroid cancer, head and neck squamous cell cancer, melanoma and breast cancer.  Our clinical interests include endocrine surgery specifically thyroid surgery for benign and malignant disease, minimally invasive parathyroid surgery and adrenalectomy, as well as surgery for advanced melanomas including hyperthermic isolated limb perfusion. We employ molecular biology and cell culture techniques and waste generated is disposed of adhering to U-M EHS guidelines.

This program allowed us to address on small changes to bring big impact on the environment, such as energy conservation, recycling and many other initiatives. Now more than ever it is important to do what we can to conserve energy and protect the environment, and this program allows our lab to do both on a daily basis. We recommend it to every lab on our campus Dr. Chitra Subramanian, Lab Manager

Dauer Laboratory BSRB Room 4138

7/12/2017

The central goal of our studies is to unravel the molecular and cellular mechanisms of diseases that disrupt the motor system.  In exploring these diseases, we are also interested in understanding a fundamental question relevant to CNS disease generally: what factors determine the selective vulnerability of particular cell types or circuits to particular insults? Our primary focus is on Parkinson’s disease and DYT1 dystonia. For each of these projects, we focus our efforts on disease genes that cause these disorders, employing a range of molecular, cellular, and whole animal studies to dissect the normal role of disease proteins, and how pathogenic mutations lead to disease.

I was not aware of the large implications that many small changes in a lab can have on the environment, such as increasing our -80 degree freezer to -70 degrees, until joining the Sustainable Lab program. Now more than ever it is important to do what we can to conserve energy and protect the environment, and this program allows our lab to do both on a daily basis.  Stephanie Mrowczynski, Technician

Vittal Laboratory BSRB Room 4858

7/06/2017

Our research focuses on the mechanisms underlying immune-mediated lung injury with emphasis on understanding epithelial injury and mesenchymal activation in Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis (IPF) and chronic rejection occurring post-lung transplantation.   IPF is the most common form on interstitial lung diseases (ILD) with an ‘orphan disease” status.  It has no known etiology or an effective treatment modality that can reverse the progression of the disease.  Our work focuses on the roles of IL-17A in epithelial injury and mesenchymal activation and complement activation in epithelial injury and tissue repair.   We employ techniques like cell culture, QPCR, Western blot, Fluorescent staining and micro biology protocols.  The solid and hazardous waste generated from our lab is being disposed of adhering to U-M EHS guidelines.

“The Vittal lab is glad to participate in the Sustainable Lab program, which helps our lab take steps towards creating a safe eco-friendly laboratory environment.”  -- Ellyse Cipolla, Lab Manager

Keller Laboratory NCRC Bld 20 Room 326W-2 to 4

6/28/2017

Our lab investigates mechanisms that contribute to bone metastasis of prostate cancer.  We also have active interest in the contribution of aging to the development of genitourinary disease, and employ several animal models (including zebrafish) to pursue these studies.  The solid and hazardous waste generated from our lab is being disposed of in adherence to U-M EHS guidelines.

“We are happy to participate in the Sustainable Lab program, and we have taken steps to create a safer and more sustainable laboratory environment.  We recycle waste when appropriate, purchase eco-friendly products, and turn off and unplug unused devices to reduce energy consumption.  By participating in various campus reuse programs, we try to re-use reagents, materials, and equipment before purchasing new ones.  We are glad to contribute to U-M’s campus-wide goals to improve up on sustainability”  -- June Escara-Wilke, Greg Shelley: Lab Managers

Lin Laboratory NCRC Bld. 28 Room G097E

6/26/2017

Our work specializes in the study of microbial consortia.  As a result, we do considerable genetic work, including various standard biological procedures that include but are not limited to PCR, gel electrophoresis, genetic transformations, HPLC and fluorescent microscopy.  We also use various microfluidic techniques to study microbial communities in droplets for high throughput applications. Hazardous and non-hazardous waste generated in our lab is disposed of adhering to U-M EHS guidelines.

“Functionalized sustainability initiatives demand a shared vision as no single actor is capable of building a sustainable enterprise. Instead, they necessitate making our collective diversity work for us rather than against us. The sustainable lab program facilitates this work by enabling members from across the research community to make conscious behavioral changes that reduce waste and ultimately promote sustainable laboratory practices.”

David Carruthers, Sustainability Liaison

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