Sustainable Laboratory Certified Labs

Do you want to get your laboratory on the list?

Please contact Ken Keeler at 936-6663 (kkeeler@umich.edu)

Displaying 21 - 30 of 206

Gold

Fallahi-Sichani Laboratory BSRB Room 2552

11/13/2017

Fallahi Lab is interested in experimental and computational approaches to develop a quantitative and system-level understanding of oncogenic signaling and therapeutic mechanisms in human tumors, multiplex biochemical measurement, single-cell analysis, and multi-scale and network level modeling.  Our ultimate goal is to help developing precision medicine in cancer treatment via improving how drugs are used to treat individual cancer patients.  We employ molecular biology and cell culture techniques in our work and use the supporting equipment.  Waste generated is disposed of following EHS guidelines.

“The Fallahi Lab has begun with all the sustainability aspects in place. We are in full compliance with the UM Environmental Health and Safety guidelines. We regularly check ChEM Reuse program database for our material needs and practice sustainable purchasing. We follow reuse and recycling as per Planet Blue recommendations. We follow the “Shut the sash + be safe” in fume hood maintenance. Lights, computers and major appliances are turned off at the end of the day. We look forward to maintaining this lab as sustainable as possible!  Mohan Manikkam, Lab Manager

Pinsky Laboratory MSRB III Room 7249

11/10/2017

Our lab is chiefly interested in blood vessels across many parts of the human body.  We pursue research that targets translational medicine in vascular conditions such as stroke, deep vein thrombosis, pulmonary hypertension, Myocardia infection, and atherosclerosis.  We are particularly interested in molecular mechanisms that drive a hypoxic/ischemic vascular phenotype.  We employ molecular biology and cell culture techniques in our work and use the supported equipment.   Waste generated is disposed of following EHS guidelines.

“We engaged in the ChEM reuse program to help sustain our research efforts in reducing the amount of waste we generate.  We have moved to a safer gel staining agent to replace ethidium bromide (EtBr) for the large amount of genotyping gels we use in our mouse colony. We are now raising the temperature on our ULT freezers to -70 C to save on energy, maintenance and costs”.  Patrick Robichaud, Lab Specialist.

Keane Laboratory LS&A Chemistry/Biophysics Dept Room 4070 Chemistry

11/07/2017

The discovery of functional non-coding (nc) RNAs has revolutionized our understanding of gene expression and regulation. There is a wealth recent information implicating ncRNAs as regulators of a variety of cellular and pathogenic processes. To this end, we are interested in uncovering the mechanisms and functional roles of ncRNAs in disease progression using a combination of biomolecular NMR and other biophysical and structural tools. Waste generated from our lab is disposed of adhering to EHS guidelines.

“Recently, there has been a strong global push to become more environmentally conscious. This is particularly true for areas regarding scientific research. I feel that our Sustainable Lab Program is ahead of the curve. They focus on creating awareness of the global and local impact research has on the environment and providing economical solutions to these problems, without sacrificing productivity – be that with their multiple recycling initiatives, their strive to provide safer alternatives to toxic wastes, or by simply increasing the temperature of your ultralow freezers a few degrees.

‘The future will be green, or not at all.’ ” Tracy Hodges, Lab Manager

Martin Laboratory SPH I Room 5657

11/06/2017

Our lab’s primary goal is to build a greater understanding of the epidemiology of viral respiratory diseases through the use of molecular epidemiology.   Through characterizing existing and new interventions to prevent transmission and severe disease, our research team works to identify strategies to reduce infections, particularly in individuals with chronic comorbidities and in hospital environment.  We employ molecular biology and cell culture techniques and use supporting equipment.  Waste collected is disposed of adhering to EHS guidelines.

"There are some easy and practical sustainability principles to follow that can not only result in less impact on the environment, but can also result in greater lab safety and significant cost savings. As a part of this program we have raised our ULT freezer temperature to -70 deg C. to save on energy and we recycle pipet tip boxes. I hope every other lab in the School of Public Health and the University goes through this program.”-Betsy Salzman, Lab Manager

Palapattu Laboratory Cancer Center Room 7411

11/03/2017

Our research is focused on prostate and bladder cancer.  We perform in vitro and in vivo experiments.  Instrumentations include but not limited to centrifuges, cell culture hood, incubator, Elisa plate reader, western blot equipment, microscope, pH meter, liquid nitrogen tank, etc. In short, we employ molecular biology and cell culture techniques and carry out our work. Waste generated is disposed of following EHS guidelines.

Through this program switched to reloadable pipette tip systems and joined the ChEM reuse program to help decrease the necessity for buying and disposing of laboratory chemicals. We recycle pipet tip boxes, Styrofoam boxes that comes in our shipments, and have implemented energy-saving measures for our fume hoods and biosafety cabinets. We recommend this program to other labs on our campus to reduce waste and conserve energy.  Mackenzie Adams, Lab Manager

Moore Laboratory BSRB Room 4448

11/02/2017

Our lab is interested in the pathogenesis of lung fibrosis, and in the regulation of innate and adaptive immunity post-stem cell transplant.  We employ molecular biology techniques and carry out our work with associated lab equipment. Waste generated is disposed of following EHS guidelines.

We are glad to have participated in this program. Some of the initiatives we have introduced are to switch to reloadable pipette tip systems, participating in the ChEM reuse program to help decrease the necessity for buying and disposing of laboratory chemicals. We recycle all Styrofoam that comes in our shipments, and have implemented energy-saving measures for our fume hoods and biosafety cabinets. Carol Wilke, Lab Manager

Anatomy Laboratory MS II

10/25/2017

Ours is a medical school teaching lab engaged in teaching anatomical science education for undergraduate, graduate, residents, medical and dental students.  We teach well over 1000 students per year.  Medical instruments are used to dissect cadaveric specimens placed on surgical tables.  Waste generated is disposed of following EHS guidelines.

We have joined the ChEM reuse program to help decrease the necessity for buying and disposing of laboratory chemicals. We recycle all paper, cardboard, and Styrofoam that comes in our shipments, and have implemented energy-saving measures for our laboratories and mock surgical suites. We have also implemented a program to segregate non-biological waste from biological waste in an effort to reduce energy consumption and improve recycling efforts.  Our students use Mac computers in the labs with energy saving capabilities.  Formaldehyde fumes are neutralized using MEA to avoid exposure and we’re currently researching other biodegradable alternatives to mitigating mold contamination in our laboratories.   

John Stribley-Lab Director; Dean Mueller-ADP Director; Kenny Thompson-Assistant

Coulombe Laboratory BSRB Room 3718

10/12/2017

Research in our lab focuses on defining the properties and role of keratin intermediate filaments as they relate to homeostasis in complex epithelia. Keratin filaments are crucial determinants of the maintenance of cell and tissue integrity, as well as the response and adaptation to various stresses. Aberrations in their properties and/or regulation of keratin proteins are associated with monogenic diseases and polygenic traits such as cancer. We utilize a variety of approaches and assays in our research, ranging from biochemistry and cell and developmental biology to manipulating genes in vivo.

It has always been the goal of the Coulombe to be a sustainable laboratory, which blends in well with the university’s reduce, reuse and recycle programs. We want to continue to be active in, and promote this environmental sustainability campaign. We appreciate the time and efforts of Dr. Reddy and OCS in leading the green movement.–-Beau Su, Senior Lab Manager

Seo Laboratory School of Public Health II M7027

9/22/2017

Our research group integrates nutrition with cell physiology, molecular biology, genetics, and toxicology to understand 1) cellular and molecular mechanisms that regulate metal homeostasis and transport, 2) how these processes are regulated by diet, environment, and genetics, and 3) how these processes are perturbed in human diseases associated with metal exposure or deficiency. Our current research investigates metal transport and neurotoxicity in the context of environmental exposure and pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases. This research has been supported by the National Institutes of Health K99/R00 “Pathway to Independence” award to study the influence of genetic variation on metal neurotoxicity and Parkinson’s disease. To explore these areas, we combine the use of both cell and animal models along with investigations in human subjects.  Waste generated is disposed of following EHS guidelines.

“We have switched to reloadable pipette tip systems. We also joined the ChEM reuse program to help decrease the necessity for buying and disposing of laboratory chemicals and try to limit our use of hazardous material. We recycle all styrofoam that comes in our shipments, and have implemented energy-saving measures for our fume hoods and biosafety cabinets. Additionally, we conserve energy where possible by powering down machines not in use. ” Tiffany Nguyen, Safety Liaison

Mosberg Laboratory CC Little/Pharmacy Rooms: 3546, 3552, 3553, 4551

9/21/2017

Research in our lab focuses primarily on molecular recognition between small to medium size ligands (usually peptides) and their macromolecular targets (usually membrane-associated, G protein-coupled receptors, GPCRs) and spans structure-based drug design and synthesis, combinatorial synthesis, protein structure modeling, and biochemical characterization.  We use the supporting synthetic, analytical and characterization equipment in our work.   In other words, ours is wet lab and waste generated is disposed of following EHS guidelines.

We have switched to reloadable pipette tip systems and joined the ChEM reuse program to help decrease the necessity for buying and disposing of laboratory chemicals. ChEM Reuse program is really a great way to share unwanted things/solvents with others, recycle and reduce unnecessary waste and clutter. We were also able to get several pieces of glassware, for free. We would have to buy them otherwise. We recycle all Styrofoam that comes in our shipments, and have implemented energy-saving measures for our fume hoods, computers and printers.  I have had a chance to test a new, waterless reflux condenser. It works great, especially for refluxing in solvent with higher boiling point and most importantly, it can save hundreds of gallons of running water. It is not cheap but definitely worth consideration.  Kate Kojiro, Lab Manager

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